Redeeming Words: Language and the Promise of Happiness in the Stories of Döblin and Sebald (Suny Series, Intersections: Philosophy & Critical Theory)

David Michael Kleinberg-Levin


Probing learn of the way literature can redeem the revelatory, redemptive powers of language.

In this probing examine Alfred Döblin’s 1929 novel Berlin Alexanderplatz and the tales of W. G. Sebald, Redeeming Words deals a philosophical meditation at the strength of language in literature. David Kleinberg-Levin attracts at the severe thought of Benjamin and Adorno; the idealism and romanticism of Kant, Hegel, Hölderlin, Novalis, and Schelling; and the 19th- and twentieth-century considered Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Derrida. He indicates how Döblin and Sebald—writers with considerably diversified types operating in numerous old moments—have in universal a fight opposed to forces of negativity and an target to lead to in reaction a undeniable redemption of language. Kleinberg-Levin considers the fast moving, staccato, and hard-cut sentences of Döblin and the ghostly, languorous, and depression prose fiction of Sebald to articulate how either writers use language in an try to recuperate and bring this utopian promise of happiness for all times in a time of mourning.

“Redeeming Words is a chic, hugely realized, and incisive exploration of the way language—and hence the best literature of our time—both registers the adventure of the lack of utopia and affirms wish by way of making the loss extra transparent. It takes as its subject the main profound reflections at the function of phrases in a time of abandonment and disenchantment. Kleinberg-Levin argues not just that phrases speak this feeling of loss yet represent it via failing to accomplish overall mastery and transparency and self-consciously thematizing the corruption and likewise affirmative strength of phrases. on the inner most point, this examine analyzes phrases and what the very life of phrases can confer to participants and communities.” — Peter Fritzsche, writer of The Turbulent international of Franz Göll: a standard Berliner Writes the 20th Century

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